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July 27 2019
Issue No. 2

It Was a Great Week for …

Boris Johnson, undeniably. Then again, it was probably his last good week for quite some time. But mainly it was an excellent week for feeling embattled—just ask Giuseppe Conte, Carrie Lam, Ricardo A. Rosselló, or the chronically aggrieved Donald J. Trump.

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The View from Here

You forgot, didn’t you?

Everybody does. Recently, we were in the middle of a conversation about the Middle East and forgot the word for Egypt…

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Shaggy Boris Story A prime minister without a portfolio, pen, or a prepared speech

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A sensational pedophile trial could have stunning repercussions throughout the British establishment

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"It's not a multiverse. It's a copyright violation."

Head Case Our gadget columnist tests a brain-enhancement device

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From left: the original edition of Brave New World, from Chatto & Windus, London, 1932; brave new Jennifer Doudna, pioneer in C​RISPR technology, in her lab, in Berkeley,​ California.

Should the Rich Be Allowed to Buy the Best Genes?

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"What catastrophe are you watching now? Political or natural?"

The Magnificent Seven

Isata Kanneh-Mason, the next musical star in Britain’s most gifted family
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The Dior Suit

Two grand exhibitions on Christian Dior are running concurrently—one at London’s Victoria and Albert Museum and the other at the Dallas Museum of Art. Central to both shows is the black-and-cream suit called Bar, a stunner from the House of Dior’s first collection, La Ligne Corolle (also known as the “New Look”), shown in February of 1947. Many think Bar was the best-selling model of that first collection. It was not. The best-sellers were New York, Maxim’s, 1947, and Amour. Bar, however, was the collection’s signature look, because it spoke volumes. READ ON

Discover

The Curious Case of the Vogue Grifter Yvonne Bannigan went from high-profile assistant to convicted felon. Hers is a particularly sad New York story

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Mike Pence Wants a Fluffy Robe


The Climate Crisis Will Turn London as Hot and Dry as Barcelona

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Viva Zapata The inventor of the Flyboard channels his inner Tony Stark

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Second-Class Goopsters
Thanks to Goop for Men, now the average guy can feel just as bad about his physical self as women do

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Foreign Intrigue Why did a company part-owned by Jared Kushner receive $90 million in overseas funding?

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Sex and Death in Stuttgart

A misunderstood aristocrat in love with a mysterious woman, both of whom die, may be a ballet cliché—Swan Lake, anyone?—but British choreographer Kenneth MacMillan’s 1978 Mayerling is anything but standard. Fleshing out the haunted lives and downward spiral of Crown Prince Rudolf of Austria and his mistress, Baroness Mary Vetsera, who died together in a suicide pact in 1889, MacMillan’s ballet is historically detailed, psychologically perceptive, and graphic, its mixture of realism and classical dance still daring more than three decades after it debuted. READ ON

Discover


Where’s the Beef? Veganistas declare war on the faux-meat movement

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Cush Jumbo

“If your church is the theater, New York means a lot,” British actress Cush Jumbo has said. The native Londoner initially came to New York in 2015 to star in Josephine and I, a one-woman play about Josephine Baker, which Jumbo also wrote. It includes anecdotes from Jumbo’s own experiences as a mixed-race woman—an autobiography-cum-biography of sorts. During the play’s run, Jumbo was approached by Christine Baranski and the creators of The Good Wife, who soon cast her in a three-episode arc that ultimately became an ongoing role on the series. And so, instead of returning home to London, Jumbo relocated to New York, and settled into life on the small screen. READ ON

"Alrighty, we've got three Tofu Pad Thais, four Green Curry Lunch Specials, side of Veggie Dumplings, and three Summer Rolls with Peanut Dipping Sauce."

Podcast-a-Go-Go So many goodies, so little time. Which shows should
I be listening to, where to start, and how many chortling introductions can I take?

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B&N It’s Not The woman behind Once upon a Time in Hollywood’s costumes selects her favorite L.A. bookstore

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Christy Turlington Burns Chooses the books that inspire her in activism and motherhood

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Chances Are…

by Richard Russo
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Animalia

by Jean-Baptiste Del Amo
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Three New Mysteries

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Ask Richard

Dear Richard,

I’m going to be in Milan for a day en route to the brand-new Mandarin Oriental on Lake Como, which friends swear is great. It’s a birthday gift from my wife of two years, who also is insisting that she take me shopping.

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The Less Crowded Capri


Norman Stone Waspish, iconoclastic British historian was a man of the right in a field of mostly left-wingers

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Dream House A writer’s idyllic retreat in Greece

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Graydon Carter and Alessandra Stanley

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