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Notes from Underground

You Say Tomato, I Say Tomahto

The Rhys Woman

Going Rogue

Eight questions with Patrick Radden Keefe, best known for his accounts of the Irish Troubles and the Sacklers, whose new book profiles all manner of crooks

Misery Loves Company

Ottessa Moshfegh’s bleak yet funny novels have earned her a cult following. Her new book takes things a step further

Talking Contradiction

Notes from the archive of the Jewish Nobel Prize laureate Isaac Bashevis Singer show that even he, a renowned pacifist, was torn when it came to Israel and its place in the world

Murder, They Wrote

This month’s crime novels take readers around the world, from Boston and Edinburgh to islands in the Caribbean and the Indian Ocean

Greenwich Village Sunburnt

Crooked Teeth and Dodgy Leaders

Though it came as a shock to many, Brexit was nothing more than the latest round in an argument as old as the British Isles themselves

Genuine Fakes

Creature of the Night

The former director of the 90s’ hottest nightclubs reveals the work behind the parties

The Empires Strike Back

Paradise Found

Grandi Giardini Italiani, which works to protect and manage Italy’s best gardens, celebrates its 25th anniversary with a heavenly new book

The Spy Who Came In from the Cold

A retired C.I.A. officer gets back into the game to solve a perplexing case

Something About Them

What Women Want

In an interview with Three Women’s Lisa Taddeo, the author discusses grief, vengeance, her new story collection, and, of course, women

The Shot Heard Round Russia

The little-known story of how Catherine the Great conquered her fear of doctors to inoculate herself and her country against smallpox

Jet Lag

Out with a Bang

It’s common knowledge that an asteroid wiped out the dinosaurs. But the way it did is surprising

A Family Affair

Staff Picks

Don’t miss a timely look at the men who invented guns, a romp through the origins of modern feminism, and a thriller set on a cross-country train ride

The Inner Bond

Spies Fall Out

Howard Hunt imagined himself the Ian Fleming of the C.I.A. Then came Watergate

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