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Ash Carter


Ash Carter is the Features Editor for AIR MAIL. Formerly, he was a Senior Associate Editor for Esquire and Town and Country. With Sam Kashner, Carter, who lives in New York, is the co-author of Life Isn’t Everything: Mike Nichols, as Remembered by 150 of His Closest Friends.

16 results

A Master Trickster, Re-Discovered

Remy Charlip created fanciful books for children—as well as everything from theater design to choreography (including the “Air Mail Dances”!)

Solace for the Disenchanted

Bank Notes

Being There

There’s no substitute for seeing a concert in person, but these tracks will tide you over until that’s a possibility again

Taking—and Making—Liberties

Three years after #MeToo allegations sank his Laurene Powell Jobs–funded magazine, Leon Wieseltier wants back in

Reappearing Inque

An interview with the founder of a Kickstarter-funded literary magazine that’s defying the rules of digital media

Sounding the Alarm

Thomas Chatterton Williams, an originator of Harper’s “Letter on Justice and Open Debate,” on cancel culture and the future of free speech

Death in London

Martini, Anyone?

Christine Baranski on The Good Fight, her bathrobe-clad Sondheim tribute, and spending lockdown in a house full of children

The Covidfefe Chronicles

You can’t spell “pandemic” without “me,” backward

Cinema Paradiso

In her debut movie, Gianni Agnelli’s granddaughter tells the story of an eccentric family in early 1990s Italy

Act Two

In 1963, Mike Nichols was a 31-year-old former comedian with no immediate prospects. Then he met Neil Simon. A new book recounts what happened next, in the words of the key players

They Publish the Perished

Thanks to New York Review Books Classics, masterpieces such as Stoner, Speedboat, and Poison Penmanship are back in print and finding new fans

Nazis in the Basement

France

Succession, starring Ghislaine Maxwell

Her family makes the Roys of HBO look like the Brady Bunch

The Id of HBO

Bill Murray had Harold Ramis. Danny McBride has Jody Hill, who discusses the duo’s “misunderstood-angry-man trilogy”