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The Arts Intel Report

A Cultural Compass
For the World Traveler
A Cultural Compass
For the World Traveler

Miriam Beerman/Sheba Sharrow—Her Story: Revisiting Women Artists of the 20th Century

Sheba Sharrow, Don’t Look Now, 2001.

“My passion for curatorial activism led me to explore the pairing of these two pioneering artists,” the gallerist and curator James Yarosh said of Miriam Beerman and Sheba Sharrow. Often overlooked in the 20th century (sexism!), Beerman had a solo show at the Brooklyn Museum in 1971, one of the first female artists to do so. Known for her focus on color and for applying thick layers of paint to her canvases, the late artist used such methods to help tell vivid and moving human stories. Sharrow’s work is described as figurative but it mainly evokes intangible notions of life, death, yearning, power, and spirituality. In bringing these two artists together, Yarosh hopes to bring their talent to light. “Individual in their styles, both used their artistic voices unapologetically,” he says. “Together, they lift one another up, each illuminating the beauty and strength of the other.” —Jeanne Malle